From Ulcers to Audio by Libby Fischer Hellmann

I was diagnosed with ulcers in February, and I know the exact day they started to form. It was the day I realized the entire way I’d been marketing my books over the past 10 years had, in the digital e-book age, had become obsolete. I remember realizing that I’d have to learn a totally new way of promoting:  all online, all “soft” marketing, all very time-consuming.

Not the thing a hard-charging, results-oriented former PR person wants to hear.

Four months later, the ulcers are – thankfully –gone, and I’m feeling better about marketing, too. I went “back to school” (metaphorically) to learn the ABCs of e-book promotion. I teamed up with a couple of writers’ groups to share the load; started keeping tabs and submitting my books to new websites and blogs like Daily Cheap Reads and Kindle Nation Daily, as well as other emerging gatekeeper sites; polished my Facebook fan page; started using Twitter more; joined a couple of blogs; plus a hundred other things that, by trial and error, I’m either continuing to do or I have abandoned it.

While without a doubt surviving in the digital age requires a lot more effort and has significantly slashed my writing productivity (at least for now), there are other perks. There is no question that the Digital Age has presented authors with opportunities that used to be only a dream.

Like producing an audiobook.

I am in the midst of producing the audio of SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE, my seventh novel, and I’m having more fun than I’ve had in years—mostly because I used to be a video producer.  I worked in both corporate and broadcasting jobs – in fact, my first “real” job was at KYW news radio in Philadelphia. For me audio is “theater of the mind.” You have the voices, the effects, and the words, but you get to visualize the characters – the way they look, their expressions, their body language. It’s the bridge between reading and film, and it’s a medium I’ve always cherished. There’s just nothing like closing your eyes (as long as you’re not driving) and letting your imagination wander.

So far two of my novels and four short stories have been produced on audio. However, in each case, I’ve had to wait years for them to become available.

No more.

Now, with everything digital and online, it’s possible to produce an audiobook quickly, at a reasonable cost, and still have a professional product.  This is exactly what I am doing. No, I’m not voicing it myself – I’m not that crazy. But I have a friend – a published writer herself – who’s also an actress and whose voice is a writer’s dream come true. When she started reading a sample chapter, she read it exactly the way I wrote it, which is a testament to her talent. She changes her modulation, her volume, and her tone, depending on the character. And she does perfect accents.

But I’m getting ahead of myself.

I knew enough to realize that recording the book is in some ways the easiest part. The trick is to hook up with a distributor who can get it on the most popular audio download sites. While that market has coalesced – Audible, iTunes, and Amazon are the major distributors today – there are smaller venues that I wouldn’t know. However, a distributor does.  So even before we started recording I Googled “audio distributors.”: Imagine my surprise when a familiar name popped up: the wife of a friend who used to work at Mystery Bookstore of Los Angeles (RIP).

I immediately emailed my friend.

“Is this YOUR wife?” I asked.

“It is,” he said.

“How did I not know she was into audio books?” I said.
“You never asked,” he said. “She’s been doing this for years.”

We immediately connected and I emailed her a sample MP3. At the time I thought I’d be able to record on my Mac with a Snowball mic. Unfortunately, she emailed back that the quality wasn’t professional enough. Too much “noise.”

So I called an old friend who owns a video studio near my house, worked out a reasonable rate, and we started recording. We’re over half way through. The best part is that I can bring home the tape, import it into Audacity and edit each chapter. Did I ever tell you how much I love editing? Whether I’m editing words, audio, or video, I love the process of assembling raw footage, sound, or words, and creating a compelling story. What’s more, compared to film, audio is easy. Audacity makes it simple. Essentially, it’s a word processing program for sound. It even has the same commands as Word. (It’s also free, BTW). I’m able to make cuts and splices, eliminate breaths and sibilants, extend pauses, and take out unexplained clicks and clacks. It’s a very satisfying process.

We have about three weeks left to go. Then we will do a final mix with a sound engineer who’s done audio books before. After that, I’ll email the final product to my distributor who will do her thing. With luck it will available by fall.

I waited two years for the audio to EASY INNOCENCE. It will be three years for A PICTURE OF GUILT. But SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE came out last winter. Barely eight months later, it will be available as an audio book.

There are times I love technology.  This is one of those times.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Libby Fischer Hellmann is the award-winning author of the Ellie Foreman and Georgia Davis mystery series, and NICE GIRL DOES NOIR, a two volume short story collection. She also edited the highly praised crime fiction anthology CHICAGO BLUES. She has lived in the Chicago area over thirty years.

 

Feel free to contact Libby at libbyfh@comcast.net

 

See more of Libby’s work on the Outfit

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2 Comments

Filed under Publishing, Reading and Writing

2 responses to “From Ulcers to Audio by Libby Fischer Hellmann

  1. Great blog, Libby! Recently I’ve been teaching a toddler to ride a tricycle (long story there), and watching him reminds me of me, pumping my little legs as hard as I can, trying to keep up.

  2. About this same end up being really specialized in terms of you write.

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